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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
. steve forbes. steve, the evidence is mounting that maybe we should privatize. >> absolutely, david. we see real experiments in this country. 16 airports have privatized security. including san francisco and a study was done comparing san francisco to los angeles and san francisco even though it's a private contractor, the agents are trained like they are for regular tsa. 65% more productive than in los angeles. they have more flexibility though the pay and the benefits are the same. it works. >> rick, let me put it to you this way. is it possible that privatization could be worse than what we have now? >> probably not. to steve's point he is right. the statistics between san francisco and l.a., san francisco did great. however, so you understand the full story, there are other airports that tried where it didn't come out any worse but not so good. look, if you look into what a lot of the aviation experts have to say, basically what they tell us is it's a nicer wrapper around the same product. you still have government supervisors, identical technology, identical procedures, they don't
the israelis and the palestinians is still another story. let's bring in nbc's steve handsman from washington. good evening, steve. >> reporter: raj, thanks. good evening. startling admission from president obama as he wrapped up his middle east trip, saying that middle east peace in essence would be tough. startling because he had gone there to tell the israelis and the palestinians that peace was possible if they compromised and worked harder. in jordan, the president and king abdullah discussed syria next door. mr. obama pledge $200 million in u.s. aid for syrian refugees. but the president sounded gloomy about the israeli/palestinian conflict west of jordan. >> we're just going to keep on plugging away. the window of opportunity still exists, but it's getting more and more difficult. >> reporter: earlier mr. obama met palestinian leader abbas in bethlehem at the church of the nativity. and in jerusalem, a visit to the holocaust memorial gave mr. obama a chance to correct what he had implied in 2009, upsetting many jews, that the holocaust alone justified the establishment of israel. >> bu
's po pork. >> brenda: and okay. steve, go ahead, weigh in on this? >> it's far worse than anything you guys are talking about here. it's not the political process. with a few notable exceptions, nobody in washington cares about the taxpayers. that's the problem here. listen,voters want to get rid of all this. they say it over and over again and if it takes a few senators want to do this, they insist on doing it, they insist on these things being included, all it takes is somebody to say no. >> oh. >> brenda: gary b, gary b is dying to get in here. go ahead. >> well, i don't agree, i don't agree with steve because he says the voters want to get rid of it and it's kind of like the not in my back yard. only the flip side. they want to get rid of it unless my gosh, you're going to take away that bridge or that pork you're going to build in my neighborhood. forget it. and that's-- you're wrong with that. >> you are wrong about that. tom coburn got elected saying i'm not doing anything for oklahoma. >> that was oklahoma. >> why do we have a balanced budget amendment? >> this isn't about the
. >> steve goodman believes he has a solution. the site developed an algorhythm that evaluates resume and produces a score used to identity candidates to interview. >> over two and a half resumes. 75,000 man hours in development. took us a year and a half to get there. >> it indicates the more people that use this service, more accurate it will be in terms of predicting success between applicants and the company. there is no cost to job seekers. employers pay. this graphic design jer using bright.com. she was taken aback when asked for her graduation year and level of education. >> they discrime nate on your age. >> the ceo says applicants never need to worry it only looks at the meat of the res mai. you never have to worry about human bodies. >> a company brighten have strengths and weaknesses. >> a tech position in the bay area will score well and will find great candidates. for other industries such as agriculture won't be as well. we zront a ton of the jobs on our site. >> bright might be taking a search out of job search. in san jose, abc 7 news. >> we've got sandhya patel. >> an
into rebuttal. mr. williams we will start with you and you have three minutes. >> thank you. steve williams, again on behalf of albright. there was a lot of focus on the neighbors, the 20-foot set back that was referenced by mr. blache that is all on romona's property there is not set back being provided on the property and she objects to the openings on that side. and this is a site permit and i submitted as exhibit 21 the administrative bulletin that says that what you have to do in order to get a site permit, they have not complied. mr. duffy also referenced this, if you look at 4 d, structural design document was not submitted in order to obtain this site permit and you have to do that if you are going to get peer review and you heard the engineer say that we welcome the peer review. they have not complied and the permit should never have been issued. this is a demolition, you do not have to wait until they take all of the walls and ceiling and floors down because we know for a fact that is what is going to happen because the building code does not allow the elements of the building whi
the hawkins team. i would like to introduce william hauck hawk, steve nee lablont and the comanagers of the team their assistant. i would like to welcome them to the podium to go through the packet and also on attachment two. >> just a couple of questions before you bring them up. i am impressed with this group because they have done serves for about 200 transportation agencies and significant and in line what we're trying to find. if you can talk about the other ones that applied, i think three out of the seven and talk about the difference in terms what the hawkins group presented compared to the others just to give us context for the decision? based on what you said and the experience seems like a really great decision, but just have some context. >> sure. not a problem. like i said we received seven firms. would you like to know the names of the firms. >> yes. >> we received other than the hawkins company, gilbert treed associates, cough man associates, anchor resolution, sequence staffing, bob murray and associates. they are not only located in the bay area but throughout t
accused in the worst crimes in the world. >> steve: what happens with gitmo from now on. 150, 160 guys you. is it stand out prison. are they there foamp now? >> the government has tried seven people in 11.5 years and even those convictions have mostly been reversed. so it looks like those people will stay and not be tried which is the real injustice. the victims of 9/11 zervet trials and real trials and beef never been able to pull it off. >> stephen: is it just going to turn into a terrorist retirement snoam. >> looks like -- >> stephen: it's a beautiful location. >> it is. thage ghanas are very nice d the iguanaas are very nice. everybody. thank you very much. [cheers and applause] nation -- thank you. [cheers and applause] earlier this month john kerry was sworn in as secretary of state, an announcement that was met with a resounding, "yeah, okay." [laughter] and on sunday, he embarked on a ten-day, nine-nation marathon that i was surprised to see did not include his homeland of easter island. [laughter] but in germany, i was proud to see he made the case for american greatness. >> peop
. neil smith is the head of cable. when steve burke moved over to nbc universal after 12 years of earning comcast cable and took us from two or 3 million customers to 20 and we became a cable company in 30 states, huge job. when neil got here, he wanted to make it work better, and it's all about improving service. although we are nowhere near where i would like us to be and where the definition of good service never ends, being able to self-help, get it right the first time, make it simpler -- i think we have made terrific strides. >> why do you think the cable industry seems to have had a reputation for not the best service at times? >> i think it's inherently unpopular to ask people to pay for television. or not,you like it where the ones collecting the bill. company,gle content sports company, entertainer, journalist gets a raise every year. we have to go back and raise rates every year. i thinkand successfully, to improve the value of what it is you receive , you get it high definition you can watch it on an ipad in your home, your watching it outside of your home. still notl of that,
for employers to review. >> they are check boxing the jobs and applying to thousands of jobs. >> steve believes he has the solution a site developed an algorithm that evaluates a resume and makes a score to identify candidates to interview. >> over two million resumes, 8.5 million job seekers and 57,000 man-hours of development and took a year and a half to get there. >> they say more people that use the service, more accurate it will be in terms of predicting success. >> there is no cost to job seekers. the employer pays. she is a graphic designer and using it for the first time. however, as an older worker she was taken aback when asked her graduation year. >> to discriminate upon your age. >> they say applicants say not to worry. >> it looks at the meat or core of the resume. you don't have to worry about that. >> san francisco based company, it does have strength and weaknesses. >> a tech position will score very well and find great candidates for great jobs. for other industries such as agriculture it won't perform, as well. >> by doing a better job, they may be taking the search out of jo
steve, sir, this was a very successful demonstration of our medical surge cape pblt and it was well done. but now we need to evolve and keep moving this forward. what we did on this particular time was stand-alone demonstrations of our particular capabilities. i think the next thing we need to do is a joint demonstration. for example, our shock trauma has many similarities to a dmat that might be a next step in the evolution of this type event. it also, after discussing with several members of the hospitals during the tour yesterday, it's clear that there are many other civilian military training opportunities that exist. those can be maybe collaboration between medical personnel in military and civilian hospitals and many other options like that are possible. >> thank you. for our guests, what questions do you have? again, we have some microphones that can go around, we have two up front. >> very interesting. i have a question, both lewis and i were down at katrina right after it happened and one of the issues, you know, there were many medical issues. one was pharmaceuticals. di
. to his left, colonel laura yeager, 40th combat aviation brigade. to her left, commander steve everett, to his left lieutenant colonel dana, marine corps installation west. thank you. let me go ahead and start off by talking a little bit and just going back over some of the discussions yesterday that i think are going to play into this discussion. we had vice admiral beeman talk a little bit yesterday about capabilities and vice admiral zunkoff talked about partnerships, unity of effort, unity of command. mayor lee talked about dod efforts, expertise, community efforts and as we go into all those discussions today you will see best practices applied during the 10 years from those fires. i have the pleasure of working for administrator fuget in fema headquarters. fema's role is to coordinate response between state and local governments and his focus, his direction to us really comes down it 3 things. he asks us to always plan for the worst case, the maximum of the maximums and it's go to see the department of defense is incorporating this within the catastrophe policy that was spoken
. >> they are going on line and check boxing the jobs they want to apply for. >> steve believes he has solution. it's called bright.com, they developed an algorithm that evaluates a resume and produces a score. >> over 2 million resumes, 8.5 million job seekers, 20 million job descriptions and 75,000 man-hours development and year and a half to get there. >> it indicates that more people that use the service more accurate algorithm will be in predicting success. >> there is no cost. employer pays. >> he is a graphic designer but as an older worker she was asked for her graduation year and level of education. >> to discriminate upon your age is discriminate. >> applicants don't need to worry. >> algorithm doesn't look at the data but the meat of the resume. so therefore you never have to worry about anything like that. >> a san francisco based company it has strengthens and weaknesses. >> a tech position will score very well and score great candidates for great jobs. for other industries we don't have a ton of jobs on that site. >> so bright might be taking the search out of job search. >> katie: it
. >> oh, you are right i have it. it is easy to find. >> okay. >> hello, commissioners, steve methiason centralization and the different things that we are dealing with on broadway and central one of the things was several of the adult entertainment and night clubs are pushing the customers out of the clubs at 2:00 a.m. and closing their doors and not taking control of their patrons once they have got them out there. so sergeant gains is going around the different clubs and kind of advising them that they are still responsible for their patrons just because it is 2:00 and they are out of the door it does not mean that they get to go home, everybody has to be safe and along their way as well as not being loud and fighting. several small restaurants are operating after 2:00 without extended how widers permits and they are advised as well and more of an issue on broad way. >> i spoke with john regarding the loit tering at the adult entertainment venues and he sent out the letters and it seems to be helpful as far as not having the loitering out in front. and we met with a long shore man ha
to get here. i'm not going to be an idiot to ride my bicycle to work and tucks in my pants. neil: steve, it is always good to have you. on that issue, whether it is big oil or anything above, saying the. neil: i do want to focus on this development about all of the money company selling out. but not like you'd expect help the economy. as we mentioned, a very serious commitment. >> the s&p 500 pays out in dividends. also hitting the 118 billion. letting the multiplier taken fact for invetors. the. neil: what you make of that? >> everyone running these companies -- not all of them are rational people. as opposed to taking a risk in investing it in some other way. it might create jobs, butt could also be a risk to the company. i sat on the board of the company that did just that. we looked at all of the options and say, we have cashier. we c use this cash. >> yes, this is still capital preservation. >> yes, a few things going on. a huge cash flow -- [inaudible] so they have to return it one way or the other. next 10 years, shares of the next decade could go up to be one it can remarkably g
. neil: steve, it is always good to have you. on that issue, whether it is big oil or anything above, saying thank you orville and wilbur... ...amelia... neil and buzz: for teaching us that you can't create the future... by clinging to the past. and with that: you're history. instead of looking behind... delta is looking beyond. 80 thousand of us investing billions... in everything from the best experiences below... to the finest comforts above. we're not simply saluting history... we're making it. let's say you pay your guy around 2% to manage your money. that's not much you think. except it's 2% every year. does that make a difference? search "cost of financial advisors" ouch. over time it really adds up. then go to e-trade and find out how much our advice costs. spoiler alert: it's low. really? yes, really. e-trade offers investment advice and guidance from dedicated, professional financial consultants. it's guidance on your terms, not ours. that's how our system works. e-trade. less for us. more for you. the. neil: i do want to focus on this development about all of the money com
. >>> before we get to your tweets, time to catch up on some homework. back on february 6th steve in florida called for input on black rock kelso capital, bkcc for all you home gamers. i didn't know it and introduced digging, black rock kelso invests in what are known as middle-market businesses, companies with revenues between $50 and $500 million. the stock yields a 10.4% yield which seems like a red flag, but as you know we find sky high yields a worry, but this is a investment company that trades with the elevated payouts. at the same time, we are a private equity player like black stone, more upside and more predictability. next up brett was one of my emeritus with one of the largest networks of assisted living, retirement and alzheimer communities in north america. they care for seniors who can't stay home alone anymore but not in need of nursing care is a stress full-time for everyone involved. the company on some 190 communities leases now is 141, about 30,000 units. i think emeritus is in the baby boom for my generation. did you get an excellent entry point here? let's check your tw
to thousands of jobs. >> steve believes he has a solution. the site developed an algorithm that evaluates your resume and produces a score employers use to identify candidates to interview. >> over 2 million resumes, 8.5 million job seekers, 20 million job descriptions, about 75,000 man hours in development and it took us about a year and a half to get there. >> they indicate the more people who use the service, the more abc news democrat it will -- the more accurate it will be. the employer pays, not the job seeker. clarissa is using bright.com for the first time. but as an older worker she was taken aback when asked for her graduation year and level of education. >> they can't discriminate upon your age or education. >> the ceo said plants don't need to worry. >> the algorithm doesn't look at that data, only the meat or the core of the resume so you don't have to look at human bias on the resume. >> bright does have strengths and weaknesses. >> a tech nation in the bay area will score well in the bay area. other areas, agriculture, it won't perform as well because we don't have a ton of jobs
for and applying to thousands of jobs. >> steve believes he has a solution. it's called bright.com. the site developed an algorithm that evaluates your resume and produces a score employers use to identify candidates to interview. >> over 2 million resumes, 8.5 million job seekers, 20 million job descriptions, about 75,000 man hours in development, and it took us about a year and a half to get there. >> bright.com indicates the more people who use the service, the more accurate it will be. that's in terms of predicting success between the appearly can't and the company. the employer pays, not the job seeker. clarissa is using bright.com for the first time. but as an older worker she was taken aback when asked for her graduation year and level of education. >> they can't discriminate upon your age or education. >> the ceo said applicants don't need to worry. >> the algorithm doesn't look at that data, only the meat or the core of the resume, so you don't have to look at human bias on the resume. >> bright does have strengths and weaknesses. >> a tech position in the bay area will score well.
and tucks in my pants. neil: steve, it is always good to have you. on that issue, whether it is big on that issue, whether it is big oil or anything above, saying [ male announcer ] you are a business pr omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] yes, you could business pro. yes, you could. national. go like a pro. ...amelia... neil and buzz: for teaching us that you can't create the future... by clinging to the past. and with that: you're history. instead of looking behind... delta is looking beyond. 80 thousand of us investing billions... in erything from the best experiences below... to the finest comforts above. we're not simply saluting history... we're making it. got you ! you cannot escape the rebel forces ! ahhh. got you ! got ya ! gotcha ! got ya. that's all you got, brother ? take that. never having to surrender the things that m
the whole going from rick, the bureau chief, on to rich, who covered the national security council, steve roberts, and marty schulte who were alternating congress and white house, bernie, the foreign diplomatic correspondent, and they weave in and out. i'll do a long one of marty. primarily because it tells what it was like there without exception if you started in the new york times at that time. marty said, got a bachelor of law degree and then i went into the service for two years and came out and took a v.a. course called, how to get a job. the burden of which was something to do -- go for had gone you're interested. and i wrote 110 makes and i was offered copy boy jobs, mailroom jobs. took the one at the new york times. when you got that job, according to the v.a. course, consider at it food in the door and make yourself useful to the people doing the work you've whatnot to do, and some day a task will come and somebody will be on a project or on vacation or sick and they'll look at you and say, what the heck, he knows how to bring us coffee, how to rip copy of off the machine. give
was with. [ laughter ] shy could tell something give me all your money, steve, guy, i don't know. what's your name? steve? whatever, come on. [ phil ] when you have joint pain and stiffness... accomplishing even little things can become major victories. i'm phil mickelson, pro golfer. when i was diagnosed with psoriatic arthritis, my rheumatologist prescribed enbrel for my pain and stiffness, and to help stop joint damage. [ male announcer ] enbrel may lower your ability to fight infections. serious, sometimes fatal events including infections, tuberculosis, lymphoma, other cancers, nervous system and blood disorders, and allergic reactions have occurred. before starting enbrel, your doctor should test you for tuberculosis and discuss whether you've been to a region where certain fungal infections are common. you should not start enbrel if you have an infection like the flu. tell your doct if you're prone to infections, have cuts or sores, have had hepatitis b, have been treated for heart failure, or if you have symptoms such as persistent fever, bruising, bleeding, or palens. nce enbr
it make sense for dod to dissipate with one person over there? >> i would have to get back steve. what we have to assure there is the exchange of information and intelligence. >> thank you, mr. chairman. director mueller, thank you for the superb job you have been doing at the fbi. we spoke about using dna technology to solve serious crimes. there was a period when the crime lab had a backlog of offender dna samples. it was a lot of work but by investing technology, the fbi has cleared that backlog. the report from 2010 down there was a substantial f.b.i. dna casework back log. an update published in september found that that backlog is a very low and well managed. i want to commend you and your staff for bringing that up to date. i have no doubt that we are solving serious crimes and preventing additional people from being victimized. there are many state and local crime labs around the country that have not been as successful as the fbi and i hope that you and the fbi lab can prioritze sharing the lessons learned about clearing your backlog with the state and local governments. i wanted
a column. i discussed this once with the actor and entertainer steve allen, who has so many gifts, and i said, "you know, does it ever amuse you that people compliment you for your gift, as if you had lined up when they were being passed out and took one from here and one from there?" and it did, and it does me as well. i don't know how i do it. i don't know how ideas come to me, they just do. it's just a gift. i'm grateful to have it. >> do you write fast? >> sometimes. sometimes it takes-- it depends on the subject, and it depends on the story. sometimes i'll have to go look up some information or do a little research or get somebody to do it for me, and that will take a little while. but generally, i start with a certain series of ideas and ideals, a certain philosophical base. i'm not looking for a deliverer, for example, from any government agency or for the congress. there's no doubt in my mind as to why we have cultural collapse. as lincoln said, "we've forgotten god, that's why all this has happened." so that gives me, in my judgment, kind of a step up on others who are still loo
and steve king has emerged of the leader of the opposition to it in the house. i do think the lack of a voice does somewhat change the calculus a little bit in having people like marco rubio and ran paul not supporting the sessions/king position. >> they can't claim this is being done by people behind closed doors without them -- they are in the room equal number. this is hopefully going true bipartisan bill. >> explain that. the senate process got a lot of attention. there's a house process as well. >> same conversation. actually our process is actually older than theirs. we started quite some time ago. we're all having conversations. >> there are members of both parties working together? >> equal number of republicans and democrats working in the house and senate to come up with a bill. bills will be very similar. >> there's this threshold issue that -- >> i was going say when we talked earlier in the beginning that this issue has, you know, it's revolving. we understand that. by the way, i happen to bree we should be going slow on it. but we've already known we've been working o
regarding an mm it to repeal -- an amendment to repeal the affordable care act. steve is calling us from indianapolis, democrat line. good morning. , there is so much waste in healthcare today. with the affordable health care act, i think that is one thing that is targeting is waste. one of my family's biggest expenses healthcare, and that is with insurance through my employer. thatis my biggest expense we have in our budget, so i think if they can target ways are you have lobbyists that lobbying hard for insurance companies, that ought to be an indication to all of us that this health care act is something we all need. host: michael in florida, on our line for republicans. caller: thanks for taking my call. host: your thoughts about the verbal care act. caller: i think it should be repealed. i think it is a disaster. the president lied about the cost of it. the people that are going to receive it don't care or know how it is going to be funded. i just think it is a total disaster, and they're going to destroy the best healthcare system in the industry. host: is there anything specifical
than up and i'm extremely excited that steve kornacki will be joining me on the weekends and he's just a fantastic person and he's really smart and has incredible -- >> everybody likes him. >> he's got this wonderful generosity about him and also just an incredible -- he's a really good reporter. he's great. he's great. what we did on up, obviously we had two hours, we weren't that pegged to the daily news cycle. we're going to have one hour, more pegged to that day's news but a lot of things happen in a day. >> does that bottle go with you? >> yeah, this will probably come with me. i think it's going to be a more appropriate acue treement of a desk of a prime time host. >> you don't want to be drinking on the weekends. >> you don't want to be tipping sunday morning at 10:00, but at 9:30 having just come out of a prime time show and change out of the suit, it's a perfectly acceptable little treat to give one's self. >> how much is that going to last? >> i don't want to say that on camera. >> got you back there, chris. anyway, tomorrow at 12:30, eastern, chris and i get into the differe
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)